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Thread: Can I use InstallShield to distribute .xlsm file with unusual references

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    2

    Can I use InstallShield to distribute .xlsm file with unusual references

    I have a Excel 2010 spreadsheet with macros that uses a DLL that is not normally installed (OWC11).

    Can I use InstallShield (Express ?) to distribute the spreadsheet with its dependent DLL ?

  2. #2
    chad.petersen Guest
    The DLL comes from Microsoft, but just not installed by default with Office? You can redistribute Microsoft DLLs that they say are "re-distributable" - and they have a long list available of exactly by name of what those are -

    But, I'd ask myself - if I understand your problem set correctly - I'd ask myself what in Office needs to be installed in order to get the DLL to install. Armed with that I would then set up a System Search in InstallShield for that DLL and if it does not exist on the target system then pop a message letting them know to go install "X" portion of Microsoft Office. This gets you out of the business of trying to distribute files that are not your own - so if an update or service pack comes along from Microsoft you get it for free instead of having to include the latest version from them in your package. There are some downsides to including files from other companies in your installer directly, even if it is legal to do so.

    Chad

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    2

    DLL comes from Micorsoft but is obsolete

    Quote Originally Posted by chad.petersen View Post
    The DLL comes from Microsoft, but just not installed by default with Office? You can redistribute Microsoft DLLs that they say are "re-distributable" - and they have a long list available of exactly by name of what those are -

    But, I'd ask myself - if I understand your problem set correctly - I'd ask myself what in Office needs to be installed in order to get the DLL to install. Armed with that I would then set up a System Search in InstallShield for that DLL and if it does not exist on the target system then pop a message letting them know to go install "X" portion of Microsoft Office. This gets you out of the business of trying to distribute files that are not your own - so if an update or service pack comes along from Microsoft you get it for free instead of having to include the latest version from them in your package. There are some downsides to including files from other companies in your installer directly, even if it is legal to do so.

    Chad
    The DLL 'used' to be distributed by Microsoft as part of Office 2003, it is no longer distributed in any current version of Office. So I cannot expect the (internal) end-user to install it from Microsoft.

    The bigger implied question was, can Installshield be used to distribute a .xlsm file rather than a VS project, I am guessing the answer is yes ?

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