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TeleFragger
09-19-2014, 01:03 PM
OK so WiseScript was from Wise Package Studio bought by Altiris then sold to Symantec now Flexera...


so long story short... if I want to get away from WiseScript as it is not being updated... what is there equivalent I can start learning? So many apps in the InstallShield 2014 and AdminStudio 2014 I cant figure it out...

example I want do to this stuff...

https://community.flexerasoftware.com/showthread.php?205246-WiseScript-Package-Editor-my-first-script&p=485719

Evan Border
09-19-2014, 08:55 PM
OK so WiseScript was from Wise Package Studio bought by Altiris then sold to Symantec now Flexera...
so long story short... if I want to get away from WiseScript as it is not being updated... what is there equivalent I can start learning? So many apps in the InstallShield 2014 and AdminStudio 2014 I cant figure it out...
example I want do to this stuff...
https://community.flexerasoftware.com/showthread.php?205246-WiseScript-Package-Editor-my-first-script&p=485719

It looks like your example is really more of a utility rather than a software package. Flexera Software has always had a programming language, InstallScript, which is the equivalent to WiseScript. InstallScript is part of the InstallShield Editor, so it's available to any customer of InstallShield 2014 Professional or Premiere, as well as all AdminStudio customers. To learn more about the InstallScript language, see the following .pdf guide:
https://flexerasoftware.flexnetoperations.com/control/inst/AnonymousDownload?dkey=7914321
h t t p s://flexerasoftware.flexnetoperations.com/control/inst/AnonymousDownload?dkey=7914321

There are certainly a lot of differences between WiseScript and InstallScript, but fundamentally they're both procedural script-driven programming languages with a focus on installing software. WiseScript is easier to get started with, but InstallScript is far, far more powerful.

Also keep in mind that we have WiseScript 2013, most recently released at the end of November 2013. So it is possible for you to keep using and updating your existing WiseScripts. If you're interested in that, talk to your Flexera Software salesperson about WiseScript 2013.

Christopher Painter
09-22-2014, 07:00 AM
I'm personally of the opinion that all of these domain specific scripting languages are no longer needed. You'd be best served by learning C# and PowerShell.

TeleFragger
09-24-2014, 10:04 AM
I'm personally of the opinion that all of these domain specific scripting languages are no longer needed. You'd be best served by learning C# and PowerShell.

I agree.. I dont see much of a need more that what we are doing so with that... PowerShell doesn't have a graphical interface... I am not wanting to learn much more as I am too busy and wont use the power of InstallScript... guess ill sit here on WiseScript 12....

Evan Border
09-24-2014, 01:42 PM
Yeah, using something like C# is a good idea, though there would be at least a slight concern about runtime support (Fresh Win7 doesn't come with .NET 4.x, fresh Win8.x doesn't come with .NET 3.x). I guess the thing I really like about InstallScript (version 12 and newer) and WiseScript is that they are self-sufficient.

Christopher Painter
09-24-2014, 07:54 PM
Once upon a time I was very, very happy with the improvements made to InstallScript in IS12. I still like InstallScript and use it occasionally. Usually to prototype code that I then hand to a C/C++ developer for conversion into a true type 1. InstallScript does have an advantage of being integrated into the compiler and not require additional build automation. However since I'm typically building .NET apps anyways it's really no big deal.

For .NET CA's I use a non-InstallShield technology that integrates very nicely with InstallShield. I compile it as .NET 2.0 and include an app.config that says CLR 2.0 and 4.0 are both supported. Then for good measure I have a custom action that does nothing but set a property called JITSUCCESS and ignores errors. Then I use JITSUCCESS in a LaunchCondition or Type 19 CA similar to ensure a useful user experience in the event of a CLR problem. This covers Windows Vista and newer and fully patched XP machines (which I don't care much about anymore).

I have a team of matrixed installer engineering resources at my day job (I'm their Architect) and over the last couple years I've been getting them into TFS/MSBuild/C#/.NET and they are very happy with their new skills. The team performs at a much higher level now.